Making Buttermilk for Chumétl

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    Talzhemir
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    Buttermilk at the grocery store is generally “late ferment”, therefore QUITE sour. In their defense, this is “Clabber”, and that’s what you need when you want fluffy biscuits. Chumétl, though, is a drink, and you might prefer it when it’s at a mellower stage. Making your own, starting with a little bottle of something from the grocery store, is MUCH better.

    Cheapskate dairies often cut buttermilk with the whey they drained from their yogurt, which is SOUR SOUR SOUR. 🙁 This would introduce some of the “wrong” microbes, but the yogurt kind are “thermophilic”, meaning, they turn milk into yogurt at 90-110F. At room temperature they will safely nap.

    What you find at the store may have even been made by “cutting” it with water, then adding in a thickener such as guar gum and carrageenan. Heard of Umami? They’ve discovered one more: KOKUMI. It’s a flavor that calcium pried out of bone with vinegar or lemon juice produces. Both guar and carrageenan bond to calcium and other compounds, which always significantly hurts the flavor.

    On the bright side, “in store” brands often use the finest innoculant. It’s a “mesophilic” culture; it will thrive around “middle”, as in “room” temperature.

    So, ready to try it? It’s VERY easy. For a first time experiment, you’ll need a recyclable plastic jug of milk (1/2 or full gallon is good) plus an empty jug of the same size.

    Wash this second one out very well. Microwave 1/2 a cup of water and pour it into the second jug to sterilize it. Squeeze it and put on the cap, then move it to get the heat all around the inside. (If you don’t squeeze it, the cap will go shooting off when the air swells.)

    Mix 1/4 cup buttermilk per half gallon for your “starter”. (This is already generous; no need to add more.)

    Set the jugs where it is about 77-78F. In 20-24 hours it will be thick and ready to eat or drink.

    Why the TWO jugs? This is in case you let it stand so long it gets pudding-like. It won’t fit through the opening anymore! Simply take a clean serrated kitchen knife and cut off the top of the jug to get at your buttermilk. Then rinse the containers and toss them into recycling as you would normally.

    If, after all this fuss, you discover that chumétl is just not for you or your housemates, here are a few suggestions.

    THINGS TO DO WITH EXTRA BUTTERMILK:
    1. Biscuits! 🙂
    2. Soup! Make a rich creamy chicken soup or mushroom broth.
    3. Paneer! Make your own Paneer or Mozzarella.
    4. Facial rinse! Yes, some people break out after eating dairy products. On the other hand, some people’s skin thrives. 1/2 teaspoon buttermilk on a damp washcloth is plenty for an after-shower moisturizer.
    5. Scalp rinse! These microbes hate and DEVOUR Candida albicans. Mix 1/8 c with 1/8 c water, and apply to itchy dandruffy head after washing/shampooing.
    6. Pet food. Cats, dogs, and chickens are crazy about it.
    7. Pre-biking tonic. The sour of buttermilk is Lactic Acid. Far from being something that clogs up your cells, it’s actually a pure food which mitochondria thrive. It is a no-insulin anaerobic nutrient. No it does NOT cause muscle aches. In fact, its presence around cells during heavy exercise indicates highly efficient metabolism of a trained athlete.

    By the way, you also get lactic acid when you let apple juice “turn”. Sour apples contain lots of malic acid, and bacteria convert this to the less sharp-tasting lactic acid. When they let wine ‘age’, “malo-lactic fermentation” is a big part of the magic that happens. Fermenting converts relatively inedible sour fruits into something that provides serious nutrition. This is also the value of making things like pickles, cole slaw, and sour kraut out of things like cucumbers and cabbage. They become calorie-rich survival foods.

    In addition to raising the lactic acid content, protein and a number of vitamins are synthesized in the buttermilk-making process. I can only conclude that those Tsolyáni Clan-Mothers who generally make it, really know their stuff.

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by  Talzhemir.
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